Minority Engagement, Diversity and Inclusion Survey

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postpartum depressionPostpartum Progress is hard at work behind the scenes to improve our support and inclusion of minority and underserved women in our community outreach and engagement. While we often feature stories on the blog from mothers of color and offering Spanish versions of the blog and nonprofit’s website are in the works, we want to go above  our current efforts to develop programs and initiatives that will reach and engage minority women both online and off, all across the country.

However, in order to do that, we first need to know what your experiences have been, and what we can do better to help you. We’ve spent the last month developing a survey that we hope will help us gain some insight into what women of color experience with their mental health during pregnancy and postpartum, levels of awareness & education on postpartum mood disorders, cultural stigma, and barriers to treatment you’ve faced.

It will help us determine what kind of support you desire and how Postpartum Progress can improve on building a community that’s inclusive.

The survey was created by our new intern Denise Carter from Emory University’s Rolllin’s School of Public Health, with input from myself based on my personal experience with PPD and anxiety. Denise is currently getting her Master of Public Health in Behavioral Sciences and Health Education. She also has a Bachelor’s in social work, with minors in non-profit management and African-American studies. She has extensive experience and a passion for helping women of color care for and improve their mental health-we are thrilled to have her helping us!

The survey is 100% confidential and anonymous-your identity will not be tracked. Please feel free to answer honestly and with as much detail as possible. The more we know about your experience with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, and what kind of support you need, the better we can help be an effective and valuable organization: changing the landscape of maternal healthcare locally and globally. Will you join us in this mission?

You can access the survey here: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/minority-engagement/

Questions, comments? Send them to us: addyeb@icloud.com or denise.carter02@gmail.com

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Postpartum Depression Screening is More Than Just a Questionnaire

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I was one of the lucky mothers who was screened for postpartum depression after the birth of my child. My daughter’s pediatrician administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale to me at my daughter’s first few check-ups.

Unfortunately,Postpartum Depression Screening it wasn’t until about six weeks after my daughter was born that I started to exhibit noticeable signs of anxiety and depression and at that time I was no longer being screened at my daughter’s appointments and my OB didn’t offer any screening or questioning at the routinely scheduled six-week postpartum exam.

Even though the screening tool wasn’t what shed light on my illness and linked me to the treatment I eventually received in order to recover, I do believe the simple practice of screening made a positive impact on me.

When the pediatric nurse first handed me the short questionnaire I remember feeling surprised, but also relieved that some attention was being paid to me, the mother. It showed me that my daughter’s pediatrician recognized that my health was directly related to the health of my baby. And if she was going to adequately care for the tiny human I brought in to her, then she had to make sure I was thriving too.

Later, when I began to show symptoms of anxiety that were not within the normal range of emotions for postpartum mothers, it was my daughter’s doctor who I felt most comfortable discussing my initial concerns with. After all, she is the one who screened me and to me that meant she cared.

The fact that I was screened also removed some of the stigma I felt early on in my illness. Of course, I still felt the guilt, shame, and embarrassment that many sufferers of postpartum depression feel, but I was a little more willing to step forward and reach out because the screening helped me realize that what I was suffering from was real and I could get help.

Ultimately, I want pediatricians, OBs, and primary care doctors to know that screening for postpartum depression not only provides useful information to help the patient move forward and get treatment, but it also sends a message to that mother that she is cared for and that it’s okay to ask for help. In my case, the fact that I was screened made more of an impact on me than the screening itself.

Every mother deserves the kind of care that was provided to me and it’s time more doctors stepped up to the plate and assumed responsibility for helping mothers find their way through these miserable illnesses. My daughter’s doctor wasn’t my therapist or my psychiatrist, but by screening me she helped me realize that some of the things I was feeling were not normal and that I needed to find the right doctors to help me.

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Perinatal Mental Health Hero

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Perinatal Mental Health Hero

I recently was introduced to a Labor & Delivery nurse who is making a huge impact on the state of perinatal mental health care pathways. I could feel the passion come through in her voice as we spoke a few weeks ago on the phone for nearly two hours about what she was doing to raise awareness and increase access to quality care in our local area (Washington, DC metro area) for women who desperately need it.

I asked Kisha to share her story in a few paragraphs, and this is what she sent me to share with you:

“I grew up in the small southern town of Crowley, Louisiana. After graduating High School, I enlisted in the Coast Guard to see the world. I was stationed in Hawaii for 3 years at a small boat station, then became a USCG Dental Technician Petty Officer 3rd Class. My final duty station was at the Department of Transportation in Washington, DC. Prior to leaving the USCG, I became a Massage Therapist. It was during my 5 year stint as a Massage Therapist, that I rediscovered my heart for nursing. I graduated college, became a Registered Nurse, and a mom at 30 years old. After working as a Mother-Baby and Pediatric RN, I took a chance on Labor & Delivery and found my niche in nursing!  Eight years later, I am still working as a full-time night shift L&D RN.

Being a Labor & Delivery RN is one of the most exhilarating & frustrating experiences. Over the years, I have gained invaluable frontline skills, instincts, and knowledge about calming a woman’s fear in the throes of labor and empowering her to embrace motherhood. I am proud of these abilities and love sharing the birth experience with women and their families, but in all honesty the realization of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) prevalence among mothers and its detrimental impact on families has dramatically shifted my perception and purpose. My heart breaks knowing that over 8 years and countless births, 1 in 7 of those pregnant women and new mothers that I cared for inevitably went home suffering in silence from a PMAD. Maybe some of them already knew they were high risk and had support in place, but for many they went home with an infant and the expectation that their mental health was secondary in motherhood. As I continue to bear witness to the subtle shifts that seem ‘normal’ after childbirth (lack of sleep, lack of self-care, lack of support) that directly contributes to this needless suffering, I have found my life’s work is to destigmatize PMADs, while alleviating the unnecessary suffering of these women and their families.

As a frontline nurse, I believe that we as a profession are key to a long overdue paradigm shift in perinatal mental health. We are well-positioned and equipped to assess the mental health of pregnant women and mothers in the acute care setting, provide them with the first aid emotional support they need, and connect them to the appropriate perinatal mental healthcare providers and resources in their community.”Kisha Semenuk is a mama to two young boys. And as a night shift nurse who recently obtained her Masters of Science in Nursing, Kisha completed her Nursing Capstone Project on the knowledge gap she identified when researching perinatal mood and anxiety disorders and effective postpartum depression screening using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) among frontline perinatal care providers (OBs,Perinatal RNs, & Mother-Baby RNs).Through her deeper research, Kisha became acutely aware that as a frontline RN she was bearing witness to the silent suffering of so many women and families. Nothing was being done about it on the frontline and Kisha wanted to take action to make lifesaving changes.

She began actively networking with frontline OBs and built a team of fellow perinatal mental health champions who helped her to compile and organize an online resource which will allow women and their families to easily locate specialized, local professionals, support groups and treatment facilities. This resource will be kept at the fingertips of frontline nurses who are often the first healthcare professional to recognize the emergence of a perinatal mood disorder.Kisha’s mission with the DMV (DC-Maryland-VA) Perinatal Mental Health Resource Guide is to develop, disseminate, and maintain a comprehensive, up-to-date, regional directory of specialized mental health providers, support groups, advocacy organizations, and other relevant clinical resources pertaining to perinatal mental health. This directory will assist providers, patients, and their families with obtaining specialized mental health evaluation and treatment during pregnancy and postpartum.

How amazing would it be if we could create a guide like this for every city in our country? I am so energized and extremely appreciative of all the blood, sweat and tears she has poured into this project and I cannot wait to see it take off and bring help and relief to so many families who in the past did not know where to turn.

I applaud Kisha’s dedication and drive for instituting change in an area all of us here at Postpartum Progress care deeply about.

{The DC-MD-VA (DMV) Perinatal Mental Health (PMH) Resource Guide is launching online by November 1 and is a result of an ongoing collaboration between the DMV PMH Resource Guide Team and existing DMV-based PMH Professionals and Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders (PMADs) survivor support network. Team members include: Kisha Semenuk, L&D RN and MSN; Aimee Danielson, Director of MedStar’s Georgetown University Hospital Women’s Mental Health Program; Lynne McIntyre, the Mid-Atlantic Postpartum Support International Coordinator/Mary’s Center Maternal Mental Health Program Coordinator; Helen Conway, Psychology Major (C’15) Summer Intern; and Dina Karellas, L&D RN and Nurse Informatics Graduate Student; in addition to Adrienne Griffen, Founder of Postpartum Support Virginia (PSVa), and Nadia Monroe, Founder of Postpartum Support Maryland (PSMd).}

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