Michelle Woo

    Warrior Mom Conference 2017: Tickets On Sale Now!

    Love. Support. Sisterhood. All in one place.

    Join us this year in Denver to learn, connect, heal and develop relationships that will last well past our journeys through a perinatal mood and anxiety disorder like PPD.

    Tickets are on sale NOW for the Warrior Mom® Conference 2017, the only conference on maternal mental illnesses created by and for moms with lived experience. Register here. This event sells out every year.

    Why gather with us at #WarriorMomCon?

    To learn. Experienced advocates, mental health experts, and community leaders will educate, empower, and engage mothers who have experienced a perinatal mood or anxiety disorder (PMAD) so that they may better advocate for themselves and other moms.

    To play. We’re hosting this year’s conference at the Grand Hyatt Denver, with sweeping views of over 10,600 miles of gorgeous, snow-capped mountains, a heated indoor pool, rooftop track, (and a Starbucks!) all just two blocks away from 16th Street, one of Denver’s most popular shopping districts.

    To connect. There’s power in the words, “Me, too.” Take a look at the video made by attendees of last year’s conference.

    Whether you seek knowledge about maternal mental health, connection to peers who understand what it’s like to wonder if you’ll ever feel like yourself again, or you want to use your experience to help others, we hope you’ll join us this year for the 2017 Warrior Mom® Conference.

    Mental Health In Color Initiative: Meet The Scholarship Recipients


    To recover from perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, women of color must be seen and heard without the roadblocks of judgment and bias. But too often, racial differences between clients and providers make an already difficult process even more difficult.

    There is a massive shortage of mental health providers who are specialists in maternal mental health, and sadly, that shortage grows exponentially when it comes to providers of color.

    We want to help change the landscape of maternal mental health for women of color by investing in the future of Black women. That’s why last year, Postpartum Progress launched the Mental Health in Color Initiative. We are providing training scholarships to mental health providers of color who are interested in expanding their professional expertise into maternal mental health. We believe that this training will improve the standard of care for everyone.

    Today, we are proud to announce the program’s first scholarship recipients.

    Desirée Israel, LGSW
    Desirée Israel is a mental health professional who focuses on postpartum recovery. She has a longstanding commitment to postpartum well-being and is active within the Postpartum Progress community. Her areas of professional focus are on Cognitive Behavioral, NTU Psychotherapy, and holistic energy healing (reiki). Desirée works with the pre and postnatal client populations. She applied to the scholarship in order to deepen her reach and bring effective knowledge to the work she is already doing.   

    Collette McLean, LCSW
    Collete McLean is a mental health professional who focuses on multiple forms of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy interventions. Her specialization is in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Combined Parent-Child Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Additionally she employs Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Collette works with college students at a mid-size state school. She applied for the scholarship in order to provide a resource to pregnant college students, a demographic that is often missed and undersupported.

    Olivia Baylor, LCPC
    Olivia is a mental health professional whose focus is work with LGBTQI couples. Olivia is particularly passionate about this demographic and often sees additional harm shown to LGBTQI identified individuals due to their lack of visibility in maternal mental health work. Olivia’s theoretical approaches are CBT, Narrative Therapy, Solution Focused Therapy. Olivia is also a gender affirming therapist.

    As our operating budget grows, it’s our goal to be able to offer even more scholarships in the future. For questions about Postpartum Progress’ Mental Health in Color Initiative, please contact program manager Jasmine Banks at jasminebanks@postpartumprogress.org.

    Get Ready For The 2017 Warrior Mom® Conference!

    In 2016, over 170 women with lived experience came together in Atlanta, Georgia to learn, connect, heal, and share all the ways they are reaching back to help pull their sisters up. There is such power in the words, “me too,” and in developing relationships that last well past our journeys through a perinatal mood and anxiety disorder like PPD.

    Whether you seek knowledge about maternal mental health, connection to peers who understand what it’s like to wonder if you’ll ever feel like yourself again, or you want to use your experience to help others, we hope you’ll join us this year for the 2017 Warrior Mom® Conference. Learn more about the event here.

    Registration opens soon.

    Photo Credit: Amy Dingler Photography

    How My Friends Stood By Me In The Darkness of Postpartum Psychosis

    Today’s Warrior Mom guest post comes from Eve Canavan, who lives in the UK.


    By Eve Canavan

    I was the first of my girlfriends to have a baby. They were excited I was going to be a mommy, and so was I. I envisioned us taking walks together, pushing the stroller along the road, laughing and enjoying this new life.

    And then I gave birth.

    Instead of gazing at baby Joe in wonder, I found myself too scared to look at him. I would shake in his presence and started experiencing vivid hallucinations. I couldn’t remember how to get dressed, and I developed an intense fear of the future. The idea that my baby was here forever sent me into a terrible frenzy, and I would look at the clouds and try to work out a way to escape the world.

    My friends wouldn’t be able identify with my new life, and especially with this illness, I thought. How could they? I didn’t even understand what was happening to me. But while my mind had run away from me, they were still there.

    Courtney visited me one day. I remember thinking the room was dark and that I felt very, very cold. She was on the sofa being lovely, and I could hear my teeth chattering.  I couldn’t focus on what she was saying — all I could do was nod and say, “Yes.” But her presence made me feel safe. I will be forever grateful for her shoulder, for I leaned on it when I felt like I was standing on my own.

    Then there was Cheryl. In an attempt to leave the walls that I was convinced were closing on in me, I left my house to visit her. As I walked down the high street, I had a panic attack. In my mind, the buildings were stretching all the way to the sky. When I arrived at her house, I sat on her sofa and said, “Chez, I am struggling. I think I have made a mistake. Having a baby is not what I thought it would be. I’m crying all the time and I am scared. She took my hand and said, “Evie, you will be okay. Maybe not right away, but you will be. I am here for you. We all are. Anything we can do, tell us, because you’re our friend and when one falls, we will all lift them up.” She told me about the book Feel The Fear and Do It Anyway and said it may help with my anxiety. She reassured me I was doing a good job and that I could always talk to her. I felt so comforted by her words.

    I also think about Rachel. At the time, my symptoms were becoming too much for me to cope with. I became suicidal and was hospitalized. My hair started to fall out. I wanted to shut everyone out and for everything to stop. I had forgotten how to use my phone — it confused me and my eyes went blurry when I looked at it. Rachel told me I sent her endless rambling text messages, repeating things over and over. But she continued to message me. She wanted me to be able to look at my phone and see that I wasn’t alone. Knowing this is amazing. My friends still cared about me, and that lifted me.

    When Joe was 7-and-a-half weeks old, our friends Nik and Kath drove 200 miles to see me in the hospital. The unit agreed I could leave for a couple of hours, and armed my husband with a handful of antipsychotics in case I felt unwell. I cuddled Kath and cried and cried. She is one of my dearest friends and just seeing her made something in me lose a little of the terror for those two hours. She had gone to such an effort to see me in my very darkest of hours.

    Over time, through exposure therapy and other treatments, I got better. Joe is now seven. He is the greatest little fireball of energy and passion. He builds Lego and goes to women’s marches with me and is truly the best thing to ever happen in my life. I have found a love I never thought possible.

    I have always valued my friendships. Having someone to confide in, laugh with and drink wine with is the greatest feeling, but after becoming unwell, I have seen the other side of friendships. How friends can lift you and give you hope when you think all is lost. How they can provide a nonjudgemental shoulder to cry on and how they will cry with you when you are at your lowest ebb. How they will be there to help pull you through.