Why Aren’t We Screening Every Mom?

Why Aren't We Screening Every Mom for Postpartum Depression?

Yet another study has been published stating that universal depression screening is effective and feasible. This one covered 9000 women and showed that women who were screened in pregnancy were much more likely to get treatment. Once again we see a link between screening and good outcomes for moms. So why aren’t more doctors screening every mom? Were you screened?

I wasn’t. I’m pretty sure that I cried at every single prenatal appointment that I had. At first I blamed it on shock. We’d only been dating about five months when we found out I was pregnant. Then I blamed it on hormones. My OB never gave me the EPDS (the most widely used screening tool) or spoke to me directly about depression. She did ask how I was feeling, and she was very reassuring that the three of us would be okay. Looking back now I can see that she was worried about me: I was the classic definition of a depressed woman. So why didn’t she screen me?

I have a history with depression and anxiety. I was diagnosed in my early 20’s and medicated for almost a year. That information was in my chart. So why didn’t she screen me?

Adam and I went to all of the birth classes offered at our local hospital. I was extremely anxious, almost terrified of the process, of everything that was happening to us and of everything that was to come. No one mentioned postpartum depression or anxiety in any of the classes. They very definitely didn’t mention anxiety or depression during pregnancy. Why did no one tell me the ” title=”Risk Factors for Postpartum Depression and Anxiety” alt=”Risk Factors for Postpartum Depression and Anxiety”>risk factors?

If I had been screened I definitely would have been flagged. I definitely would have gotten help. Inside I was hoping and praying for someone to save me, but I didn’t have the words; I didn’t know what was happening to me. If Adam and I had ever seen a list of risk factors for postpartum mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) it could have changed everything. Looking at it now I see just a long list of, “Yup, that’s me!”

Studies like this one are so necessary. They back up the lived experience of moms and families all across the country.

“The results of this study suggest that routine depression screening in women, both during pregnancy and postpartum, can lead to high levels of mental healthcare use among women who screen positive.”

For just one moment let me speak to any Obstetricians, Midwives, Doulas, Nurses, and anyone reading this who interacts with pregnant women and new moms: Please screen every pregnant woman and every new mother you come in contact with. Please tell pregnant women and new mothers the risk factors for PMADs. Please explain the prevalence of antenatal depression and anxiety. Early detection and treatment can save lives, it can change lives, it can work miracles. Women do not have to suffer in silence. You can save us.

To all the moms out there who weren’t screened: I’m sorry. I want you to know that I am one of you. I want you to know that I have promised my daughter that if she is ever pregnant, this will NOT happen to her. I, and so many other mamas, am working at the community level to ensure that every mom is screened. Postpartum Progress is helping to lobby for legislation that will move us towards universal screening. There is so much that you can do to help!

Call your doctor and ask why you weren’t screened. Ask if they are planning to implement a screening program for pregnant women. Share studies like the one discussed here that show how effective screening is.

Call your hospital and ask if the risk factors for PMADs are discussed during birth classes.

Call your midwife or birth center and ask if they screen every mom.

Call your doula and ask if she discusses risk factors with moms and screens moms.

Contact your Senator or Representative and ask if they are voting for the Bringing Postpartum Depression Out of the Shadows Act.

Help me keep the promise I made to my daughter. Let’s get screening for #EveryMomEveryTime.

About Graeme Seabrook

Graeme Seabrook is a mom of two from Charleston, SC. After suffering with postpartum depression and anxiety following the birth of her son, Graeme sought out support groups online and in her area. Those groups saved her and turned her into a fan of and advocate for peer support. Graeme writes about her journey with maternal mental illness and parenting with PTSD on her website, postpartummama.org.

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  1. OMG I have been preaching this so much!! I cant believe I just came across your article. WHY aren’t they making it mandatory for OBs to discuss PPD before the baby, why don’t they have you the mother come in with a spouse or family member and talk about what to look for as in the warning signs. Instead spouses think “your crazy now” I cant stay if you keep this up” what happened to you” instead of those comments, they can help mothers/their wife who is suffering and get them help. It can save bonding experiences with the baby, relationships, & most importantly lives.