Show, Don’t Tell: The Fine Art of Advocacy

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Writing with InkShow, don’t tell.

This is one of the greatest tenets any writer has drilled into them at an early age.

Show, don’t tell.

Show us the action. Do not describe the tree, show us the verdant ferocity with which it lived -through calm, sunny days as well as through the darkest storms with sopping rainfall, making its roots cling even deeper into the earth beneath it. Make the tree’s yellow and spotted leaves tickle your reader’s cheeks even though they sit wrapped in a soft blanket in the safety of their living room devouring loquacious artistry. Convince them to scour the landscape to find this tree as it sheds its leaves for the last time, weeping that it will not survive to burst forth into a new spring.

Breathe life into your scenes. Do not describe them. Instead, cradle each word, hold it to your mouth, and make it rise and fall with your breath. Quicken the pace of your reader’s pulse as their knees buckle and they fall to the ground when your story reaches it denouement. As your reader leaves your words behind,  you want them dizzy with passion, filled with a yearning for more of your spirit.

Show, don’t tell.

One of the most difficult tenets to put into practice yet one which is absolutely necessary to transform any piece of writing from mundane to spectacular. It is far easier to tell someone to “Show, don’t tell,” than it is to put it into practice.

When we show instead of tell, we bring our readers into our world. We create a connection with them which allows them to utter the words, “Me too” aloud to no one in particular. The best writing may not be the most critically acclaimed or the most perfectly executed but that which fosters a strong connection because the author has been where the reader now finds themselves.

Why is this important? [Read more...]

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More PPD Events on the Way This Spring: Triathlons, Martinis & Flower Power

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A fewupcoming events I wanted to make sure to mention:

Jenny's Light is hosting a series of triathlons for kids from March through July, all to be held at San Jose State University. These events will raise funds for the organization, which works to raise awareness of postpartum depression and other perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. And don't worry, your kids won't be biking and running and swimming for miles. As described by Jenny's Light, "Our events are designed for fun with distances from 50 yards to 300 yards swimming, 2 miles to 8 miles cycling, and 500 yards to 2 miles running. All kids receive a finishers medals. All kids are able to use a kickboard if they need to during the swim." Great idea!

Flower Power Mom is hosting Celebrating Midlife Mother's Day April 11th through May 9th, with the goal of relieving stigma and highlighting the unique gifts of wisdom, strength and truth of over-40 moms. Funds raised by her event, which include the sale of t-shirts, will be donated to Postpartum Support International. You can learn more here.

Baby Blues Connection, which supports mothers in Oregon with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, is hosting a "Martinis and Chocolate 50s Style Cocktail Party"fundraiser on May 1st in Portland from 7:30 to 10:30pm. The event will include a Mother's Day gift basket auction. Tickets are $30 each and can be purchased here.

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Postpartum PTSD Sometimes Mistaken as Postpartum Depression

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The website The Survivors Club offers a story on postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder, which we rarely see covered, so this is nice.Check it out!

Here's the full story on postpartum PTSD from Taffy Brodesser-Akneron Salon.com.

Also, click here if you'd like to read more stories on postpartum PTSD.

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New Group Created in UK to Support Women with Postpartum Psychosis

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What do I write about first? After 6 days in a row with the kiddos at home, the backlog is enormous. So many things to tell you about … I'm going to start with this neat discovery, which I happened upon thanks to Elaine Hanzak.

The UK has an organization called APP, which stands for Action Postpartum Psychosis. This group was created for women "across the UK who have experienced postpartum psychosis and who want to increase public awareness and research into the condition. APP is run by a team made up of academics, health professionals and women who have recovered from PP."

Their goalsare:

  • To provide up to date research information to women who have experienced PP and their families.
  • To facilitate research into all aspects of PP
  • To increase awareness of PP – its symptoms, management and impact – among health professionals and the general public

I think this is great. Women who experience postpartum psychosis often feel even more isolated than those of us who've had other perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. It appears that the group is in its infancy, so the website is lacking very many resources at this moment but I hope to see it grow.

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