Postpartum Among Top 10 Fastest Growing Topics at Meetup.com

How about this tidbit? Today I found out that "postpartum" is one of the fastest growing topics at Meetup.com. It's #7 overall on the top 10 fasting growing topics. I think that trend will continue. I think that more and more moms will create postpartum support Meetups, or at least list their already existing support groups at Meetup.com.

People ask me how Postpartum Progress has become the most widely-read blog on postpartum depression. What did I do? I don't advertise. I'm certainly not a social media genius — I have a hard time keeping up. The reality is that it has nothing to do with me. It could be anybody doing this blog.It has continued togain readers, as haveall the other great PPD bloggers,for the same exact reason that "postpartum" is the seventh fastest growing topic at Meetup.com:

Women going through postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety, postpartum OCD, postpartum PTSD or postpartum psychosis WANT AND NEED TO TALK to other women who are just like them. To share. To see they are not alone. To see they will get well.

I sometimes wonder if that's the most powerful treatment method of all.

I say the more postpartum peer support groups meeting in libraries, Starbucks,living rooms,churches, community roomsandhospitals, the better.To join a postpartum meetup or start your own, click here.

About Katherine Stone

is the founder of Postpartum Progress. She has been named a WebMD Health Hero, one of the fiercest women in America by More magazine, and one of the top 20 Social Media Moms by Working Mother magazine. She is a survivor of postpartum OCD.

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  1. Most of the members of the PPD Support Group I facilitate here in Atlanta found it on the web through meetup. Though it is a personal financial cost to me, the ease of women in need being able to locate the support group in a way that a blog or even traditional website would not allow is a blessing.

  2. Wendy Davis says:

    And remember that we have wonderful PSI volunteers that offer informed and caring phone and email support, groups, and community resources for free, every day of the week. You can find them in your state at http://www.postpartum.net/local-support

  3. For those who want to start their own group, there are a few local "self-help group clearinghouses" worldwide that provide free help to women wanting to join with others to start their own groups when one isn't available: http://www.mentalhelp.net/selfhelp/selfhelp.php?i
    Here at our New Jersey Self-Help Group Clearinghouse, we NJ women with a free guide on how to start PPD mutual support groups.
    – Ed http://www.selfhelpgroups.org
    "My years as a medical practitioner, as well as my own first-hand experience, have taught me how important self-help groups are in assisting their members in dealing with problems, stress, hardship and pain… the benefits of mutual aid are experienced by millions of people who turn to others with a similar problem to attempt to deal with their isolation, powerlessness, alienation, and the awful feeling that nobody understands… Health and human service providers are learning that they can indeed provide a superior service when they help their patients and clients find appropriate peer support."
    – former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, MD